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Saturday, 4 August 2018

REPOST: How Beer Saved the World

I am enjoying trawling through some of my favourite posts and publishing them again - I think it's better than posting nothing at the moment, (which would be the alternative)!

How Beer Saved The World

I'm here to defend the good name of beer and to tell you how it saved the world. Really.
Many scientists and anthropologists now believe that it was not the desire for bread that kick-started the agricultural revolution that ended hunter-gathering 9,000 years ago; it was the yearning for barley to make beer. This led to inventions such as the plough, the wheel, irrigation, mathematics and even led to writing! This cascade of world-changing innovations was brought about by the desire for beer.
In ancient Eygypt workers were paid in beer so we could say that we wouldn't have had the Pyramids without beer. There are those who claim it is one of the major food groups because of it's nutritional content.
In modern times it played an important role in refrigeration, the discovery of germ theory and modern medicine. 
However, in Medieval times when water was too dirty to drink, possibly it's most important function was to support the population. Beer was safe to drink and men, women and children drank it morning to night, certainly in England.
That possibly is still the case in some parts! Cheers.

I'm listening to Billy Joel's 
Say Goodbye to Hollywood

14 comments:

Parnassus said...

Hello Bazza, I don't drink beer or alcohol in any form, so my judgment might be somewhat altered on this issue. However, cider (which I don't drink either) also creates a safe-to-drink liquid, and encourages the development of apple orchards, which I approve of highly. There are even special bitter cider apples, which I bet I would like to eat plain--how I would love to spend an autumn in England's fruit-growing regions!
--Jim

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Bazza - yes ... I wonder what actually did happen and how 'we' found things to eat, or use in some format ... we know beer and wine have been around for millennia, as too the grains ... I guess a compost heap somehow gave them the idea ... but who knows. Fun to read on sunny day on Vancouver Island - cheers Hilary

NanaDiana said...

LOL- That is SOOO funny Bazza!! I can't drink beer although I can do an occasional glass of wine. My introduction to beer was that I was terribly thirsty playing ball outside. I was about 20. It was warm and I drank it straight down because of the thirst. I was SOO SICK..ever since then I can not get past the smell of it.

Hope you have a wonderful rest of the weekend- Diana

bazza said...

Jim: The UK climate is well-suited to apple-growing. There 1000s of varieties. Pink Lady is a particularly good one; sweet/sharp tasty and full of flavour. I believe cider apples aren't enjoyed by many when being eaten! I am not a big drinker but I do enjoy the best whether it be beer or wine (or champagne).

bazza said...

Hilary: I always supposed that someone got poisoned by the things that aren't good or safe to eat and they tried everything! Mushrooms must have been a real difficult area of exploration.
The ancient Egyptians are supposed to have paid slaves with beer!
We've been getting 30c plus for weeks on end...

bazza said...

NanaDiane: A lot of people are put off of beer by that first encounter. It's really an acquired taste! You enjoy your weekend too :-)

Hels said...

The plough and the wheel, yes. But beer's most significant contribution was probably domestic peace. People were exhausted after a long day of heavy labour, and a glass of beer at night might have reduced the pain.

bazza said...

Hels: ....and kept them alive!

Sherry Ellis said...

I can only imagine the effects drinking beer would have on children! Glad things are different today.

bazza said...

Sherry: Well it was fairly low alcohol (hence the expression 'small beer') but those children might have survived without it!

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Fun post!

"Whoever drinks beer, he is quick to sleep; whoever sleeps long does not sin; whoever does not sin enters Heaven. This, let us all drink beer!" [Martin Luther]

Alas, I still don't LIKE beer. You could say it's not my cuppa tea. :)

bazza said...

Susan: I do drink beer but I'm very fussy about. I go for quality over quantity. I'm the same with wine. I'm only halfway there with food!

Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe said...

I returned from vacation and am catching up on the blogs that I missed. I don’t drink beer; I am more of a wino. My son does, though, and is quite adept at making his own. When I am around him and his friends and other beer aficionados, they not only drink beer but speak beer. By that, I mean knowledgeable, however, at the end of the day, there intelligence seems to wane. If it is alright with you, I would like to send him your post.

bazza said...

Arleen: Ha ha, in the UK a wino is defined as "a person who drinks excessive amounts of cheap wine or other alcohol, especially one who is homeless."! I'm sure that's not you....